Car accidents may happen for a variety of reasons, including distracted or drunk driving, but what kind of consequences do victims face when speeding is the cause? The National Highway Traffic Safety Commission notes that speeding killed over 9,000 people in 2018 and factored in over a quarter of traffic deaths the year prior.

If you are a new driver or in the habit of exceeding the speed limit, you may want to understand how speed can affect the results of a wreck, including whether you and others involved survive it.

Speed and impact 

When you drive at a high rate of speed, it can be difficult to control the motion of your car in case of a sudden emergency. For example, if you are driving on a highway with a speed limit of 60 miles per hour but are traveling at 75 MPH, you may not have the distance required to stop in time to avoid an accident if traffic slows or another car changes lanes unexpectedly. The faster you travel, the greater the impact, and the higher the risk of injury or death.

Speed and pedestrian accidents 

Speeding in areas where pedestrians are present, such as residential streets and school zones, may increase the chances of death for those traveling on foot. Because the force of impact is likely to rise with greater speed, a pedestrian may suffer severe head trauma, broken bones and internal injuries. The risk is often greatest for children, who have a smaller body mass than adult pedestrians.

A busy schedule and the pace of an active life may cause you to speed. However, you can reduce the risk of injury or death with increased driving awareness and by obeying posted speed limits.